Edinburgh is Scotland’s compact, the hilly capital. It has a medieval Old Town and elegant Georgian New Town with gardens and neoclassical buildings. Looming over the city is Edinburgh Castle, home to Scotland’s crown jewels and the Stone of Destiny, used in the coronation of Scottish rulers. Arthur’s Seat is an imposing peak in Holyrood Park with sweeping views, and Calton Hill is topped with monuments and memorials.

Edinburgh, Gaelic Dun Eideann, capital city of Scotland, located in southeastern Scotland with its centre near the southern shore of the Firth of Forth, an arm of the North Sea that thrusts westward into the Scottish Lowlands. The city and its immediate surroundings constitute an independent council area. The city and most of the council area, including the busy port of Leith on the Firth of Forth, lie within the historic county of Midlothian, but the council area also includes an area in the northwest, around South Queensferry, in the historic county of West Lothian.

Easy to get around by bus, Edinburgh is built on a human scale. This is a city that repays close inspection so the best way to get to know it is on foot. There are amazing views, hidden courtyards, secret gardens and stunning architectural details to be discovered almost everywhere you look.

Think of Scotland and the words ‘International’ ,‘Fringe’ and ‘Festival‘ come to mind, but it has much more to offer than just history, architecture and the arts.

As well as Edinburgh is an increasingly international city with five Michelin-starred restaurants, a rapidly growing bar/cafe culture, vibrant nightlife and a varied and accessible arts scene. You will also find plenty of the independent shops, boutiques and small galleries that make browsing an addictive pleasure.

Because Edinburgh is so compact, it is not just the city centre that is easy to explore. Try exploring a little further: to Leith or the ‘villages’ of Stockbridge, Morningside, Duddingston and Cramond, each with its own distinctive personality and attractions. There is surprising country walks in the city too, on Arthur’s Seat, along with the Water of Leith and in the Blackford and Braid Hills. With all this and now a festival in almost every month of the year, it really is always a good time to come to Edinburgh.

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Burns Night is annually celebrated in Scotland on or around January 25. It commemorates the life of the bard (poet) Robert Burns, who was born on January 25, 1759. The day also celebrates Burns’ contribution to Scottish culture. His best-known work is Auld Lang Syne. Many types of food are associated with Burns Night. These include cock-a-leekie soup (chicken and leek soup); haggis; neeps (mashed turnips or swedes) and tatties (mashed potatoes); cranachan (whipped cream mixed with raspberries and served with sweet oat wafers); and bannocks (a kind of bread cooked on a griddle).

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